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Saints & Major Feast Days

Saints

Holiness or sainthood is a gift (charisma) given by God to man, through the Holy Spirit. Man’s effort to become a participant in the life of divine holiness is indispensable, but sanctification itself is the work of the Holy Trinity, especially through the sanctifying power of Jesus Christ, who was incarnate, suffered crucifixion, and rose from the dead, in order to lead us to the life of holiness, through the communion with the Holy Spirit.

Categories of Saints

Through the work of the Holy Trinity all Christians could be called saints. In our society, however, who can be addressed as a saint? Who are those men and women and children who may be called saints by the Church today? Many Orthodox theologians classify the saints in six categories:

  1. The Apostles, who were the first ones to spread the message of the Incarnation of the Word of God and of salvation through Christ.

  2. The Prophets, because they predicted and prophesied the coming of the Messiah.

  3. The Martyrs, for sacrificing their lives and fearlessly confessing Jesus Christ as the Son of God and the Savior of mankind.

  4. The Fathers and Hierarchs of the Church, who excelled in explaining and in defending, by word and deed, the Christian faith.

  5. The Monastics, who lived in the desert and dedicated themselves to spiritual exercise (askesis), reaching, as far as possible, perfection in Christ.

  6. The Just, those who lived in the world, leading exemplary lives as clergy or laity with their families, becoming examples for imitation in society.

Each and every one among all these saints has his or her own calling and characteristics: they all fought the “good fight for the faith” (1 Tim. 6: 12 and 2 Tim. 4: 7). All of them applied in their lives the scriptural virtues of “justice, piety, fidelity, love, fortitude, and gentleness” (1 Tim. 6: 11).

(Source: The Saints of the Orthodox Church, George Bebis, PhD)

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Major Feast Days

The ecclesiastical year, which according to Byzantine practice begins on the first of September, is divided between movable and immovable or fixed holy days. The movable holy days are determined by the date of Easter, the most important of all feast days, which is in a class by itself. The determination of the date of Easter was definitively regulated by the decision of the First Ecumenical Synod, held in Nicaea (325). Next in importance to Easter are the “twelve great feasts,” of which three are movable. Eight of these feasts are devoted to Christ and four to the Virgin Mary. There are also a number of feast days of varying importance, most of which commemorate the more popular saints.

January 6: The Feast of Epiphany
February 2: The Presentation of Christ
Great Lent, Holy Week, and Pascha
The Annunciation
The Ascension of Christ
Holy Pentecost
August 6: The Transfiguration of Christ
August 15: The Dormition of the Theotokos
September 8: The Nativity of the Theotokos
September 14: The Exaltation of the Cross
November 21: The Entrance Into the Temple of the Theotokos
December 25: The Nativity of Christ

(Source: “The Calendar of the Orthodox Church” by Dr. Lewis Patsavos, Ph.D.)